14% of the US population will suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) at some point in their life. PTSD can develop after a person survives a traumatic situation or witnesses something terrifying. Common traumas are physical, mental abuse; accidents, sexual, natural disasters or combat.

Those who have PTSD typically have trouble functioning normally again after the trauma. Sufferers can transform into a person who is constantly on edge, anxious, unable to sleep, paranoid, depressed and isolated.

This fear instills isolation. Eventually leaving just a lifeless, shell of who they once were. This is the reason PTSD frequently leads to alcoholism, drug addiction and in some cases, suicide.

LSD (Lysergic Acid Diethylamide) AKA “Acid”

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LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide) is a non-addictive, psychedelic drug that was discovered by Dr. Albert Hofmann in 1938. He discovered the effects of LSD in 1943, when he spilled some of it on his skin. He started feeling strange and decided ride his bike home. That must have been quite a ride!

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When Dr. Hofmann got home he entered a wild (somewhat scary) mind-expanding, reality (and his wife was in for a bit of a surprise as well!) Luckily, the next day, he woke up and his mind was back to normal. He knew he must find an explanation for what had happened to him.

He began to experiment with LSD on patients and he found that

“Each individual who experiences LSD enters another reality. He enters another world seemingly even more real than actual reality. “

From the 1950s to the early 1970s, psychiatrists and researchers gave 1000’s of doses of LSD to people as a treatment for alcoholism, addictions, anxiety and depression in people with terminal illnesses.

This drug was helping people!

After the experiment, some patients described that it seemed like LSD had created more “connections” in their brain. In fact, this looks to be true.

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Brain Scans: On LSD vs Normal

Brain scans of people who are tripping on LSD show their brains are lit up brightly, illuminated with activity all over the brain.

Whereas the normal (placebo), non-tripping brain’s activity was only activated in few specific areas – the rest of the brain remaining dark and seemingly unactivated.

Brain scans revealed that the tripper can have “visuals” through many parts of their brain, not just the visual cortex. Parts of the brain that never connected with other areas, were now communicating.

Acid Helps to Treat Mental Disorders

The subconscious mind wants to mull over the same information and do the same things, day in and day out. This keeps us stuck in life repeatedly doing automatic, core behaviors.

The reason PTSD, anxiety and depression are so hard to treat is because people are trying to cover up the disorder with pills. Surprise! That shit doesn’t work!

You must treat the core issue, or underlying reason, for the disorder.

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Ideally, people who decide to trip, should think and talk about their issues with a therapist. The therapist works with them through the trip, in order for them to gain a new, more profound meaning from the experience.

Therapeutic Acid trips can alleviate depression, anxiety and help people conquer addiction.

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Patients have stated that when they were tripping, they could see their issues from a new perspective and they can then gain insights into their past behaviors and reactions. They emerge with an upgraded, positive outlook on life.

Psychological disorders can affect people for their entire lives, sometimes consuming all of their quality of life. For treatment resistant people, no matter what they try, they cannot seem to get well again, LSD may be the only possible cure for them.

There is a good amount of evidence regarding the benefits of psychedelics treating psychological disorders, but we still need more. Currently, privately funded organizations are left to do most of the research.

Hopefully soon we can end the war on drugs and instead of fearing them, learn about their potential benefits.

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